violacd01: American Hanuri Prinsessa Volume 1 1928-1929 CD by Viola Turpeinen
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Tracks:
Viola Turpeinen tanssit Kiipilla
Traditional
3:01
Hamara sotiisi
Traditional
3:17
Hollolan polkka
Traditional
3:06
Kulkurin serenaadi, valssi
Drigo
3:03
Vanhanmaan sottiisi
Traditional
3:09
Emman valssi
Sleffent
3:06
Kauhavan polkka
Traditional
2:54
Violan polkka
Guido Deiro
3:34
Penttila's Waltz
Traditional
3:25
Jake's Schottische
Traditional
3:11
.Jäähyväisvalssi (Farewell Waltz)
Ernst Rolf
3:22
Hanurimarssi (Accordion March)
Traditional
3:25
Pääskysvalssi (The Swallow Waltz)
Traditional
3:31
Hymy huulilla - mazurka (Sweet Smiles)
Traditional
3:08
Suomi sottiisi (Finnish Schottische)
Otto Hultner
3:15
Violan masurkka (Viola's Mazurka)
Traditional
3:21
Jalasjärven polkka (Polka from Jalasjärvi)
Traditional
3:09
Jalasjarven polkka
Herman Vähämäki
3:04
Viulupolkka
Traditional
3:06
Soittajan polkka
Traditional, Pietro Deiro
3:23
Mustalaisen sottiisi
Traditional
2:52
Total Time
65.12
Sound Samples:
Name
Time
mp3 file size
Viola Turpeinen tanssit Kiipilla
20s
Hamara sotiisi
20s
Hollolan polkka
20s
Kulkurin serenaadi, valssi
20s
Vanhanmaan sottiisi
20s
Emman valssi
20s
Kauhavan polkka
20s
Violan polkka
20s
Penttilan valssi
20s
Jukan sottiisi
20s
Jaabyvaisvalssi
20s
Hanurimarssi
20s
Paaskysvalssi
20s
Hymy huulilla, mazurka
20s
Suomi sottiisi
20s
Violan mazurka
20s
Ihanne valssi
20s
Jalasjarven polkka
20s
Viulu polkka
20s
Soittajan polkka
20s
Mustalaisen sottiisi
20s
Description: American Hanuri Prinsessa Volume 1 1928-1929 CD by Viola Turpeinen
Viola Turpeinen Biography     Other Viola Turpeinen CD's

Viola Turpeinen (1909-1958) was the best-known Finnish-American accordionist of her time. She toured widely in Finnish communities and made a large number of recordings with the violinist John Rosendahl and her own orchestra. She was probably the first woman in the world to record accordion solos.

She was a beautiful woman with blue Finnish eyes and light brown hair. She wore colourful dresses and often had a flower in her hair when she played. Her name VIOLA was boldly embroidered on her piano accordion. Her repertoire consisted mostly of Finnish dance music, but she also played Italian virtuoso accordion pieces and arrangements of classical music. Her own favorite was the overture from Rossini's "The Barber of Seville".

Viola Irene Turpeinen was born November 15, 1909 in Champion, Michigan. Her mother Signe Viitala was born in the same town in 1892. Her father Walter Turpeinen, a miner, was born in Kivijarvi, Finland. Viola had two sisters. When she was a child, the family moved to Iron River, Michigan. Across the street from their home on Cedar Avenue was Bruno Hall, the meeting hall of Italian immigrants. Viola would often hear the strains of accordion music emanating from the hall, and whenshe was fourteen, her father bought her a two-row accordion. She later on switched to the piano accordion. Her first teacher was an Italian named Bianchi from the nearby town of Caspian. Soon she was playing for dances at Bruno Hall and the local Finnish Workers' Hall. Subsequently she continued her studies at the Piersante School of Accordion in Chicago.

John (Jukka) Rosendahl, Viola's first partner, was born as Juho Hugo Hemming Wiren in Elimaki, Finland on May 22, 1891. He migrated to America with his brother in 1908 and took the name Rosendahl. John Rosendahl was a good-looking, well-dressed man and a born entertainer. He painted signs, exhibited movies and held a variety of other jobs until he became a professional musician. His first instrument was the violin, but he also played the banjo. In the 1920s Rosendahl was touring the Finnish communities in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin with acrdionists Antti Kosola and Isac Mikkela. He first heard Viola Turpeinen at the North Star Hall in Ishpeming in August 1926 and was so much impressed by her playing that he asked her parents to let her accompany him on a tour across America.

In September 1927 Turpeinen and Rosendahl were ready to emabark on a tour which took them east through Finnish communities in Illinois, Ohio and Massachusetts. On Cape Ann, Massachusetts they played at a Finnish hall and inspired the local songwriter Antti Syrjaniemi to compose a song celebrating the event (Viola Turpeinen tanssit Kiipilla/Viola Turpeinen's Dance on Cape Ann). Syrjaniemi recorded it for Victor in 1929, and it opens this CD. In the song, Syrjaniemi claims that Viola played like heavenly bells.

By January 1928 Turpeinen and Rosendahl had reached New York, where they made their first recordings for the Columbia Phonograph Company. They were paid 35 dollars each for the four sides, a total of $140. The titles recorded are typical of the duo's repertoire. "Hollolan polkka" and "Vanhanmaan sottiisi" are traditional Finnish dance tunes. "Hamara sottiisi" is a schottische composed by the Swedish-American accordionist Edwin Jahrl and also recorded by the composer i 1926 for Columbia as "Skymnings tankar". "Kulkurin serenadi" ia an adaptation of Drigo's virtuoso piece "Les milliones d'arlequin"

Four weeks later they made another set of six records for the Victor Talking Machine Company. This time the titles included the "Variety polka" by Guido Deiro, an Italian accordionist who has inspired many Scandinavian accordionists (but here without proper credit adn with the title changed to "Violan polkka"). The move was probably motivated by the fact that Victor paid them $50 for each title, more than Columbia. Their success encouraged Viola to buy a new Exceldior accordion for $1000. This was promptly reported in the Finnish-American press.

The duo returned to the Midwest in February 1928 adn played mostly in Finnish communities in Minnnesota, with occasional visits to Michigan and Canada. In the autumn they toured Illinois and Ohio, stopping in Chicago for two days in November to record seven new titles for Victor. In spring 1929 they were again in New York, playing mostly at the Finnish Workers' (Tyovaentalo) at 5th Avenue and 127th Street on Manhattan, at Kaleva Hall in Brooklyn and occasionally on the New Jersey side. An entry in John Rosendahl's diary tells us that on April 4, 1929, they sold 818 tictes at the Worker's Hall. On usual occasions, the audiences had varied from 200 to 400.

1929 was a boom year for American record companies. There were millions of immigrants in America, and record companies were eagerly producing records for the "foreign record trade", as music for immigrants was then called. In 1929 Columbia and Victor issued nearly a hundred records by Finnish-American artists. On May 7 Turpeinen and Rosendahl recorded three titles for the Victor Talking Machine Company at their 16 West 46th Street Studios.

Three days later they were again called to record four titles, this time at 111 East 58th Street. These recordings, and more, will be found on the second CD of the Viola Turpeinen collection.


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